Friday, October 12, 2012

October Newsletter


Aggasiz Dojo News


Whew, life just seems to get busier and busier. Looking in the archives, I found I haven't sent a newsletter since July. As we move through fall, things don't seem to be slowing down much either.

Upcoming Events

We've got a couple of things coming up in the next month or two, and hopefully some of you whom this newletter reaches will be able to attend.
November 10th will have us at the Pangea Culture festival in Moorhead, MN. This event is a showcase of different cultures with lots of good food, displays, and activities for the family. We'll be in a booth meeting and greeting people and introducing the art of iaido, and also performing a demonstration of kata. Come out on Saturday the 10th from 10am - 4pm to see what it's all about. 
December 1, 2 - Our Agassiz Dojo / MWKF iaido seminar. We'll be hosting our seminar this year in Fargo, ND at the Agassiz Middle School gymnasium. Details and registration for the seminar can be found at: http://seminar.musoshindenryu.com. 
We welcome people who have never even done iaido to come and join the seminar. We had some absolute beginners last year, and it worked out fine! The caliber of instruction from two top AUSKF iaido sensei to come to our own regional seminar is quite exceptional, and a great opportunity for training. 

Rank testing

Congratulations to Sarah V. for achieving her 2kyu rank. Sarah had to perform 5 specific seitei iaido kata with a degree of competance, as well as complete a short written and oral exam. The 5 kata and opening and closing reiho have to be performed between 5:30 and 6:00 minutes, or the candidate is disqualified.
We'll be having our next rank testing in Mid-Late December, and have started back on our Koryu training in our regular practice sessions again. 

Koryu

Love it! We're going to run through the Musoshindenryu shoden series to review the kata we practiced previously, and also start back on learning the paired Tachi-uchi-no-kurai (kenjutsu-style) bokuto kata. We might even try introducing the second, Chuden set of kata if time allows. Can't wait to get going on these again! 

Dojo Space

The building owner was put under some pressure from the city to be compliant for restrooms and parking being available for the building we have the dojo in. Good for us, as the toilets should be installed within the month, and we'll have a bunch of new, paved parking spots available for us soon!
In the interim, let's be careful to not track in mud, dirt from the area in front of the door into the dojo by removing and keeping our shoes near the door.

Iaito for Sale

I've still got a good selection of top-quality iaito, sageo, oil, uchiko, and accessories for sale. I've got a website that's a work in progress where people can shop online. It's at http://iaito.musoshindenryu.com. Take a look and buy something. Go now!

One Point Japanese

Greetings and Salutations! Greetings in the Japanese language can be both formal and casual, depending on who you're saying them to. They're also "time specific" and used on first greeting of someone in the day.
Ohayogozaimasu! (Ohio-go-zai-masu) Good morning! This is a greeting used for to greet anybody during the morning hours. Typically it is used up to 11:00 AM or so. For a more formal situation, it is often accompanied with a slight bow of the head and/or upper body - for example greeting one's boss the first time you meet them that morning at work. I'd often see receptionist / office staff standing and bowing like this when all of the managers and senior staff were arriving in the morning.
Konnichiwa. (Koh-NEE-chee-wah) Good afternoon. This greeting is used from around 11:00 AM to around 5:00 PM, and is part of a larger phrase, "Konnichi wa, ikaga desuka," which essentially means "How are you today?"
Konbanwa. (Kohn-bahn-wah) Good evening. Used after or around 7 PM, but not usually before that. 
So you can see, there is a small "gap" in times where we're not using konnichiwa or konbanwa. The time of evening between 5 and 7 PM is called, "yugata," or early evening, but we don't have a specific greeting for this time of day. It's strange, and you'll just have to decide what to say when that occurs! 
Jya Ne! / Mata ne! See you (later)! This is a very informal way of saying goodbye to someone who is of equal "status" as you, friends, and family.
Jya, Mata! Same, but slightly more formal than above.
Mata XXXX. Until next XXXX. 
This could be Mata ne: Later!
Mata ashita: Until tomorrow.
Mata rai-shu: Until next week.
Mata kondo: Until next time.
Do you see the patterns here? Hopefully you can now have some idea of how to greet and say goodbye to you dojo mates and friends.
Until next time - Mata kondo!
Brad