Wednesday, December 14, 2011

December Newsletter

Motivating to Practice

As we move through December, I find myself feeling tired, stressed, and busy. I suppose it's the holiday shopping, plans and preparations, school programs, work and social events and parties, and the North Dakota sub-zero temperatures that all contribute to that.

When I feel this way, I tend to want to just sit down, relax, veg in front of the TV and turn off my brain for awhile. BUT, I know that by going to the dojo, putting on the hakama, and having a good focused practice works pretty well to get me out of my "holiday funk."

It can take a lot of effort to get myself there, but once I've finished a good practice, I feel so much better. All of my stress is gone, and the tiredness I feel is a physical one that follows from a good workout. So, if you find yourself feeling this "funk", get thee to the dojo! I promise you won't regret it.

Dojo Move

As I've mentioned in previous newsletters, we're going to be moving out of Moorhead, MN into Fargo, ND. The temporary space we're in now has been a good setting, but we're moving into a newly refurbished building just over the river in Fargo. We'll still continue to share the facility with Kyoshi Mike Cline and the Hidden Teachings of RyuTe Karate school as we do now. Practice nights will still be Wednesday from 6:30 to 9:30 with the occasional Saturday morning.

I'm not sure when the new space will be finished, but I've heard that we'll be in early in the new year.

Of course, now we really can't call ourselves the "Moorhead Dojo" anymore, can we? Should we be the F/M dojo? Red River dojo? (Grins) MoFa dojo? After much thought, some discussion, and more thought, I've decided to rename our dojo to the, "Musoshindenryu Iaido - AGGASIZ dojo."

For people not from this area, that may raise a few eyebrows and the question of "Where the heck is Aggasiz?" Well, if you check Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Agassiz you'll see that Lake Aggasiz was actually a glacial lake left from the last ice age that covered a huge area of Central North America. Its area was larger than all of the modern Great Lakes combined, and it held more water than contained by all lakes in the world today. (Really!)

Our Fargo-Moorhead region falls into the Southern tip of that glacial area, and so I thought it was a good name. I suppose in Japanese, we could call it Aggasiz-ko Dojo, though I doubt I'd be able to find a kanji that would be appropriate. Maybe there's a kanji that refers to glaciers? Hmmm….

Anyway, welcome to the first Aggasiz dojo newsletter!

Koryu is fun!

On Saturday I had a chance to run through the Musoshindenryu Okuden suwari-waza down at the dojo.

It had been a while since I've performed those kata, and I really enjoyed going through the base set, and then the variations that I know as well.

I can't say that I have a favorite kata in the set, but tanashita is always popular when I do it at demos. The scenario is that you're under a bridge and there's a sentry near the opening that you have to dispatch. Another version I've heard of is sneaking under a house that's raised on stilts.

Being a bit taller, when I perform this kata, it doesn't have the same "cool" look as with a smaller statured person. When my sensei, Mr. Takeda performs it, it's really a fun kata to watch.

It wasn't until last October when I was exposed to the paired kumitachi kata of MSR/MJER called "Tachi uchi no kurai." During the Thunder Bay seminar, Kim Taylor sensei showed a couple of us the first ten of these kata, and we were able to practice the first two. What a lot of fun! Since then I've been reviewing some of the video and images I have of these kata, and hope to be able to work on them with my own students.

Paired kata like these not only teach "ma-ii" or distance between opponents, but also allow us to practice "seme," or (psychological) pressure as we move and push the other opponent backwards with our "ki" and presence. Plus, it's just a lot of fun to do kata where we can whack at each other with bokuto (in a safe and controlled manner of course)!

While I do enjoy seitei iai, and the opportunity it affords us to compete and test for rank, I really do enjoy the koryu aspect of my training more. It seems to be more cohesive as we move through the different kata, and they seem to complement each other more than the kata in seitei.

I found some information from Wayne Muramoto about the history and origin of the seitei kata we perform. Paraphrasing.

The first seven seitei kata, were derived from various koryu iai schools. The first two kata, Mae and Ushiro, came from the Omori-ryu. The third, Ukenagashi, was from kata found in the Omori-ryu and the Muso Jikiden Eishin-ryu. The fourth kata, Tsukaatte, was similar to tate hiza techniques of the Eishin-ryu. Then the next kata, Kesagiri, was derived from the Hoki-ryu. The Morotezuki kata was a thrusting technique found in many different iai schools.

As the teaching of the seitei iai was refined, it was decided to add three more kata to further round out a student's training. The eighth kata, Ganmenatte, was derived from the Muso Shinden-ryu oku iai methods. Soetezuki came from a famous Hoki-ryu technique, and the tenth kata, Shihogiri, was also from a Hoki-ryu kata. Two more were then added again later. Number eleven, Sougiri is from MJER/MSR Soumakuri, and number twelve, Nukiuchi is from a Mugai ryu waza called Gyokkou.

Maybe it's because of this variety of origins and styles for the twelve seitei kata, I feel the transitions between the MSR kata (when done in order) to be more natural.

I've read different places where people say that the paired kata should be taught to a much higher level of student - to one who has had experience learning the standard suwari-waza and tate-hiza kata. Based on my experience from kendo, I think I would have to disagree. We learned kendo kata from the beginning of our training, and it was in fact a requirement for rank testing. The two aspects I mentioned earlier about maii and seme are something that the iai practitioner is weak in, simply because there isn't an opponent there to practice against. The paired kata can lend this missing element to our training to complement and complete it.

Plus, it's a lot of fun whacking at each other with bokuto.

Fargo All Martial Arts Seminar

Members of the (then) Moorhead dojo participated in the Fargo All Martial Arts Seminar and Cancer Beneift in November. It was a very interesting seminar with lots of opportunities for participants and audience members to try some "hands-on" technique.

We demonstrated some Seitei and Musoshindenryu kata, and then invited members of the audience to come up and cut newspaper with bokuto. Everyone enjoyed that, and we had some pretty good cutters!

I attended the rest of Saturday's seminar and really enjoyed trying some of the self-defense techniques firsthand. We learned some very good, practical techniques to use against common "attacks" or situations that people might find themselves in.

Good job to Paul Dyer who organized this worthwhile event. It was interesting and fun to attend and be a part of.

Upcoming stuff

New Year's party. The details will be announced later, but we'll be having our dojo member's party in early-mid January. Likely it will be a potluck like last year, and we'll probably watch a sword/culture again. Last year we saw the most awesome, Highlander. "There can be only one!"

Maybe this year we'll go with 13 Assassins, or even Mr. Baseball, a very funny but Japanese culturally significant movie.

Rank Testing. This also will likely be in early-mid January during a regular class. I think that the majority of our members will be testing this round, so it will likely take all class. Tentatively I'm thinking

CoreCon in April - Moorhead/Fargo.

AUSKF Iaido Summer Camp 2012 - Tacoma Washington in Late June

Aggasiz Dojo Annual Seminar - Maybe July or August

That's about it for now. I want to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Brad

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